As different trends in home decor evolve, we have found that unique bathrooms are always a popular choice. Wet rooms might not function well with every bathroom design, but when you have space and resources for one, it can add a lot of value to the home. Most wet rooms include a shower and a toilet, without anything separating them. The uniqueness of wet rooms really comes into play when choosing flooring.The most important thing to remember when building a wet room is that everything must be able to resist moisture. Waterproofing your cabinets, flooring, and appliances is mandatory in order to have a well-functioning room.Flooring is one of the key features that distinguishes a wet room from other types of bathrooms. The flooring of the shower extends to the rest of the room, so it’s important to think about the fact that there is no separation happening there. This bathroom consists of open space with no steps or raised areas, giving you more flexibility to design something you wouldn’t be able to in other rooms.
As a Realtor I would suggest adding a fresh paint job to existing cabinets before painting. As of point number #1 you can go overboard on your home as long as you don’t go over budget on your wallet. It will pay off if you are remodeling your kitchen and get cabinets that have a good look. You can get by with with cabinets that look good when closed but might not have the bells and whistles like dove tails or soft close sliders. It pays off to do a back splash up the wall and going with a granite counter top. Prices have really gone down in the last few years.
Before starting all the mess of a remodel, it’s a good plan to designate a renovation-free zone for your family to gather in semi-relaxation. Make sure you have everything you need in one place, such as a kettle or microwave, so you have one functional space to gather, eat or just unwind at the end of the day. For more relaxation ideas, check out our 8 Projects for Backyard Fun.
Do-it-yourselfers can reap big savings with recycled or lightly used fixtures and building materials. Habitat for Humanity operates about 400 ReStores nationwide, which offer salvaged materials at half off home-center prices. One caveat: Many contractors won't work with salvaged items, or homeowner-supplied materials in general, because they don't want to assume the liability if something goes wrong. That said, if you're doing your own work, you can find anything from prehung doors to acrylic skylights to partial bundles of insulation. (To find a ReStore near you, visit habitat.org.)
"A remodeling project is going to affect every room in the house," says A. J. Paron-Wildes, general manager of DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. "The homeowners need to take down pictures, move vases, and pack away valuables before work begins." While you're at it, take steps to protect your immovable fixtures, including built-in cabinets and chandeliers. Have flooring covered with cardboard sheets if it needs to stay in good condition.
For those who are thinking of putting their home up for sale five years from now, then it’s important to ensure that the value of your property would increase over time, consider having your home renovated for that purpose. On the other hand, if you’re planning to live in your home for a couple of years, it’s very important to ensure that the design of your bathroom is something you would really love and fit with your style and preferences.
Busting the budget is everyone's biggest fear when it comes to renovation. And with good reason. Even if you follow the essential advice we've been doling out for years—build in a 20 percent cushion to cover the nasty surprises, get contractor references and check them, banish the words "while you're at it" from your vocabulary—it's hard not to end up shelling out more than you want to, even if you want to pen a check for a million bucks.
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